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CocoaNymph

Today, I went to CocoaNymph. I have been meaning to go back since my friend Andi's photo show there, when Karen & I split a cup of hot chocolate and couldn't finish it. Karen found herself more giddy from the "drinking chocolate" than she did the alcohol we'd had earlier with dinner.

Filled with happiness at a place that is well-decorated with lovely local art, I bought my housemates some chocolates and enjoyed a pot of tea (only $2.50!) whilst reading and writing.

I have eaten one of the chocolates. It was a delicious cinnamon-mousse that lived up to its sales pitch.

CocoaNymph is the sort of place that I would love for my roommates to use. If I could "name it and claim it" I would call dibs on seeing Wendy's artwork on the walls, and musician-roommate Manuela's songs being played on the white baby grand.

If anyone wants to get together with me for coffee or tea, I suggest we meet here.

(how's that for a lot of links! chocolate, art and music go together like...well, like chocolate, art and music.)

Comments

Vanessa said…
I went on the website and literally was SALIVATING as I perused the chocolates they sell.
Whew.
nadine said…
Wow. Chocolate, art and music....
Yes, let's meet there one day.

Yet another reason to head west, I suppose :)
Karen said…
Oh, I think I may miss the drinking chocolate, heartbeat irregularities aside.

Say, have you heard of Blim (http://blim.ca/)? I think you might like it. It's in Vancouver.

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