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An Excerpt on Blizzards

There is a great sense of relief when I read something that sits perfectly with what I have experienced/thought/felt recently. Over the lunch hour, I read this:

Many of us have lost our way...in the whiteout of the blizzard swirling around us. Blizzards begin when we say yes to too many things. Between demands from work and family, our lives fall somewhere between full and overflowing. We multitask, so much so that we are unaware we are doing three things at once. We admire people who are able to accomplish so much in so little time. They are our role models.

At the same time many of us are overscheduled, tense, addicted to hurry, frantic, preoccupied, fatigued, and starved for time. Cramming as much as possible into our Blackberries and Palm Pilots, day planners and to-do lists, we battle life to make the best use of every spare minute we have.

Yet not much changes. Our overproductivity becomes counterproductive. We end our days exhausted from work and raising children. And then our "free time" on weekends becomes filled with more demands in an already-overburdened life...we read about the need to rest and recharge our batteries. Our workplaces offer seminars on increased productivity through replenishing ourselves.

But we can't stop. And if we aren't busy, we feel guilty that we waste time and are not productive.

We go through the motions of doing so many things as if there is no alternative way of spending our days. It is like being addicted - only it is not to drugs or alcohol but to tasks, to work, to doing. Any sense of rhytm in our daily, weekly, and yearly lives has been swallowed up in the blizzard of our lives.

Add to this the storms and trials of life that blow into our lives unexpectedly and catch us off guard, and we wonder why so many of us are disoriented and confused.

(from Emotionally Healthy Spirituality, all added emphases my own)

Comments

Sarah said…
There is a religious order whose members are encouraged to rest from their regular activities "one day in every week, one week in every month, one month in every year, one year in every six years" and use the time for spiritual renewal. I think it's a wise practice which I'm sure helps to improve not only their spiritual lives but also their mental and physical well being. God designed us to need a Sabbath rest, and we end up doing more harm than good when we don't set that time aside as He tells us to.

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