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Wednesday's Word: Strengthsfinder

A few months back, I did a Strengthsfinder assessment, a test based on Gallup research that identifies your top 5 strengths (out of 34 possibilities) and is tied to several books on leadership and personal development. The basic underlying principle that I gleaned from Now, Discover Your Strengths is that the "most effective people are those who understand their strengths and behaviors. These people are best able to develop strategies to meet and exceed the demands of their daily lives, their careers, and their families."

What doesn't want to be a person that "exceeds the demands of their daily life?" I know I do.

And I'm working with the following strengths:

1. Input

"The world is exciting precisely because of its infinite variety and complexity. If you read a great deal, it is not necessarily to refine your theories but, rather, to add more information to your archives. If you like to travel, it is because each new location offers novel artifacts and facts...With all those possible uses in mind, you really don’t feel comfortable throwing anything away. So you keep acquiring and compiling and filing stuff away. It’s interesting. It keeps your mind fresh. And perhaps one day some of it will prove valuable."

2. Strategic

"The Strategic theme enables you to sort through the clutter and find the best route. It is not a skill that can be taught. It is a distinct way of thinking, a special perspective on the world at large. This perspective allows you to see patterns where others simply see complexity. Mindful of these patterns, you play out alternative scenarios, always asking, “What if this happened? Okay, well what if this happened?” This recurring question helps you see around the next corner. There you can evaluate accurately the potential obstacles. Guided by where you see each path leading, you start to make selections."

3. Connectedness

"Things happen for a reason. You are sure of it. You are sure of it because in your soul you know that we are all connected. Yes, we are individuals, responsible for our own judgments and in possession of our own free will, but nonetheless we are part of something larger...You are considerate, caring, and accepting. Certain of the unity of humankind, you are a bridge builder for people of different cultures. Sensitive to the invisible hand, you can give others comfort that there is a purpose beyond our humdrum lives."

4. Restorative

"You love to solve problems. Whereas some are dismayed when they encounter yet another breakdown, you can be energized by it. You enjoy the challenge of analyzing the symptoms, identifying what is wrong, and finding the solution. You may prefer practical problems or conceptual ones or personal ones..."

5. Ideation

"You are fascinated by ideas. What is an idea? An idea is a concept, the best explanation of the most events. You are delighted when you discover beneath the complex surface an elegantly simple concept to explain why things are the way they are. An idea is a connection. Yours is the kind of mind that is always looking for connections, and so you are intrigued when seemingly disparate phenomena can be linked by an obscure connection...For all these reasons you derive a jolt of energy whenever a new idea occurs to you. Others may label you creative or original or conceptual or even smart. Perhaps you are all of these. Who can be sure? What you are sure of is that ideas are thrilling. And on most days this is enough."



I find this all fascinating (Ideation much?) but I haven't yet figured out the application of these facts. In theory, they're meant to affect how I work as opposed to what I do. I see their potential to influence both. And every other aspect of my life.

Eventually.

Comments

Andrea said…
I first did Strengthsfinder in one of my seminary courses. Then I talked about it so highly at UP that we all ended getting the book and doing the test. So good to see what everyone's strengths are and understanding these can create better a work environment. I am Belief, Harmony, Developer, Fairness and Responsibility.
nadine said…
I am fascinated/intrigued. I want to do a Strengthsfinder now :)

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