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Body Work*

Hey, aren’t you all wondering how my bruised and battered body is doing these days? I’m so glad you asked!

First off, my toenail is still attached. It is 70% dark purple, and there is still swelling at the base, but it is in place. Some people think it will fall off in the next 3-4 months. Some people think it will survive & simply grow out. This person is both fearful and hopeful. I might decide to paint my toes to cover it up, but at the same time, I am fearful to let go of my daily watch. (I was going to post a picture, but for the sake of Amelia, I have refrained.)


Next, the major bruises on my legs are fading. I continue to find new and unexpected ones, but they are generally smaller and less obnoxious. I feel proud about my continued sportiness (“Winter” seasons of both soccer and ultimate start this week!), and will gladly bear the marks. Especially if there aren’t any actual injuries that would require a break from sports or some sort of actual treatment… Once it’s bare leg season, I may feel slightly more self-conscious. But the pride will temper it all!


Do you remember how I’ve sometimes had this thing called sleep paralysis? Well, a couple weeks ago I had a new and exciting** sleep experience, in which I woke up holding my breath/not breathing/hyperventilating. Twice. In the same night. It was, to say the least, terrifying.  So I went to my doctor and told her about the non-breathing, and sleep paralysis (“That sounds creepy.”), and my generally light-sleeping habits (“That’s a form of insomnia.”). And now I'm waiting for a referral to a sleep clinic, and for the first time in years, the thought has occurred to me that maybe I will become a good sleeper. Maybe there is help for me and someday (soon) I will sleep through the night without waking up. What a novel and life-changing experience that could be.


I seem to have finally warded off the winter sickness that kept rolling through. Hopefully I am ready to be healthy and will stay on my feet for the last of these dark winter days.


Also, I am growing my hair out these days, and it is getting long. So long that I can braid it into one ever-curling braid. Long enough that it touches my shoulders when it is dry and not only when I step out of the shower. I’m hoping I can keep this up for another four inches, which is likely six to eight months. I think I’m capable, but we’ll see what the heat of summer does to my resolve.


Well, kudos to you for reading this far. How's your health these days?



**not exciting in a good way

*Confession: I am hooked on Tegan and Sara right now, and this song is one of the few that’re spinning round in my head. I know that it is about a slightly different type of “Body Work” than I’m talking about, buuuuuuuuut, it’s catchy.

Comments

MLW said…
I was wondering about some of those bumps and bruises. Glad to hear things are on the mend although knowing you I expect to hear of and/or see more with your continued involvement in sports. Good for you for keeping on. Whole hearted participation does tend to result in a few bumps with fellow players.
Jackie said…
I've had similar experience with the holding breath/not breathing/hyperventilating thing! Just a couple times though and with a dream attached to it. I don't remember the dreams exactly, but I remember this one time in the dream, I was told that "holding my breath" is what I do when I go from earth to heaven. As if someone at the gates was telling me, "Yes, that's what you do dear, don't worry, this is normal, hold for just a little longer, then you will see Jesus."

I held my breath until I could no longer hold it and that was when I woke up and found myself running out of breath.

Is sleep paralysis where you wake up and you're fully conscious but you can't move your body? because I had one experience just like that. but only for a few seconds. I wanted to scream.

Jackie
Amelia said…
I appreciate your non-picture.

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