Skip to main content

My Second Long Weekend

This weekend was full of food and people and food and sun and food and celebration and, did I mention, food?

I hardly had time to be un-full, and certainly never got all the way to hungry between meals. Thankfully I came back to a nearly empty fridge, so today will be easy on my tummy. It needs to recalibrate.

Despite its prevalence, this weekend was not about food. It was about laughter and joy and had a bonus topping of sunshine. Lots and lots of sunshine. A sunny day in Vancouver is one of the most happy-making experiences. Add on coffee and lunch and parties with delightful friends, and it is no exaggeration to say that I couldn’t stop smiling all weekend long.

Some other notes and thoughts:

1. Lynsey found us the perfect place to stay in Vancouver: Point Grey Guest House. Book a room that is at the back of the house, off 10th Ave. Breakfasts were a legitimate highlight, with fresh fruit, yogourt, homemade baked goods and blackberry jam from berries picked across the street! Delightful hosts. Same price as a hotel, ten times homier.

2. Turns out I really love wearing dresses. I think this could become the Summer of The Dress. This is one of my new goals.

3. Someone asked me my favourite colour and I said, “Periwinkle or teal.” He said, “Those are really girly colours.” And I said, “Yep. I’m a girl.” I don’t know if those are actually my favourite colours, but I do like them a lot. And I like the words periwinkle and teal. I think my actual favourite colour is cream or some off-white variant. How boring is THAT.

4. I could spend hours lying in the grass with Kirsten, eating blueberries and feeling at rest.

5. I don’t like carob, and that’s why I need to trust my gut, even when I fear being high-maintenance. This small moment of epiphany is part of a larger life “turning-point,” as Kirsten identified it.

6. Some friendships are incredibly easy to fall back into. Especially when you are in touch through the phone. Phone calls with faraway friends are a beautiful thing. Eating a meal with those same friends is even better. And if the view is of the (strange and wonderful people at a) beach, or you're role-playing a 1920's murder mystery? Icing on top.

7. I know many great guys in Vancouver. Why did so little dating happen in my life when I lived there?? And why do I know so few quality men in Toronto? (If you’re a Toronto guy and you’re reading this, you’re quality. 95% guaranteed.)

8. Sometimes I like being in charge of parties, and sometimes it is a little stressful. But usually, everything works out just fine, and the little hiccups are hidden by the great fun people have.

9. Dan and Christina are finally married. “FINALLY” seemed to be the theme of the day. I love attending a wedding where the guests are fully and enthusiastically on board with the newlyweds. Don’t think I’ve ever seen a kiss get a partial standing ovation before.

10. I loved everything. Like I said, couldn’t stop smiling.

Comments

nthecity said…
11. Sometimes you meet fun people at said parties and become instant friends.

I always love being in charge of parties. I think that's why I kept coming to sit by you the other night, because I needed to know that things were under control :)

I can't wait until we meet again! I'm glad we're twitter friends. Who knows, soon we'll be facebook friends!
Beth said…
nadine.

yes to friends! and yep, everything was under control...although i had no idea how things would play out. it was a strange place. not fully in CONTROL, but definitely aware of what was going on and knowing more than others... anywho. it was fun.

Popular posts from this blog

Fostering FAQ: How Can You Say Goodbye?

It seems I finally have something(s) to say... Here's the first in a short (or maybe long?) series on Fostering FAQs. If you've got a question to add, feel free to comment/email/text/message me and maybe the next post will be in response.

--

8:30 am on Day 4 of parenting. I woke up in a panic two hours ago because I remembered that there is a baby and I am responsible for her (at least at 6:30am, when the man beside me will snore through anything). Now, I have put on clothes and eaten breakfast. The dogs are walked, there is a loaf of banana bread in the oven. My tea is steeping. Most importantly, Dream Baby is already down for her first nap.

Despite my morning efficiency, I'm already beginning to see that even with the happiest, most easygoing, and smiliest baby, like we somehow managed to be given, parenting is a grind. On Friday night, I couldn't join friends for $5 pints at a local joint. Instead, I blearily washed the same 8 bottles again, and then made another ba…

Fostering FAQ: How Long Will She Stay/Will You Adopt Her?

Our first foster baby came with about 18 hours notice; it was respite care, which means we had him for a few days while his regular foster family had a break/dealt with a family emergency. He stayed 3 nights, long enough to come to church and have a dozen people cooing over his little sleeping cheeks.  With each new visitor to our quiet corner, I explained again that he would be going back to his foster family the next day.

Barely a week later, we got a 9am phone call with a fostering request and by the same afternoon, we were snuggling her. This time, we had her for 4 days before church came around. Again, our community was keen to see the little one we had in tow. Again, the question, "How long will she stay?" And this time, "Are you going to adopt her?"

--

Here in Toronto, when a child is placed in foster care, it is always for an indefinite length of time. It depends on the parents' situation, and whether they are able to make a safe home environment for th…

Fostering FAQ: What's Her (Mom's) Story?

This is probably the second most common question I hear about the baby currently in our care, right after, "Will you keep her?"

It comes in many forms:

"So, what's her story?"
"Is her mom in the picture?"
"How did she end up in your home?
"Is her mom a drug addict?"
"How could a mom not love such a cute baby!"

I get it. It's natural curiousity, and I know I've asked similar questions of my friends who are adoptive parents.


But here's what I'm learning: a child's story is their own. And equally as important, the parent's story is their own.

Imagine how it might feel to hear that for the foreseeable future, you are not allowed to care for your child. On top of whatever difficult circumstances you are already in - perhaps poverty, social isolation, lack of adequate housing, domestic violence, intergenerational trauma, drug or alcohol dependency, low cognitive functioning, or a myriad of other complex strug…